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Healing Art Gallery

Inside the Enloe Regional Cancer Center

The Healing Arts Gallery uses the power of art to inspire healing and wellness, featuring local artists touched by cancer. The Healing Art Gallery is in the main hall of the Enloe Regional Cancer Center and can be viewed by the public Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

April 14, 2017 to July 14, 2017; ♦♦♦ Art by Ann Pierce

Ann Pierce writes, "As a survivor of breast cancer (I had a double mastectomy), painting has been a way to relieve the pain. The event that triggered the most sorrow in my life was the death of my son Kevin to brain cancer. The world will suffer from the loss of his genius mind as an architect."

Ann Pierce grew up in Boulder, Colo., in an environment surrounded by art. 

Both of her parents were art teachers and served as continued sources of encouragement and inspiration. 

Ann, a professor of art for 31 years at California State University, Chico, has received numerous awards and recognition in regional and national exhibitions. 

She has been listed in "Who’s Who in American Art" since 1984.

Jan. 2, 2017 to mid-April, 2017; ♦♦♦ Art by K.W. Moore, Sr.

Ken Moore writes, "When I first came in for treatment at the Cancer Center in the summer of 2015, like most people, I had no idea what to expect. But I found that my work got me through. I painted nearly every day throughout chemo. There were very few days when I couldn’t get in at least an hour of painting. It kept my mind occupied. " 

Ken Moore was born in 1946 and grew up in the mountains of Northern California. He knew he wanted to be an artist before school age, spending hours at his kitchen table drawing and painting wild life.

The fascination of drawing, in detail, every feather on every bird brought him the discipline and dedication from the very start. Selling his first piece of art at the age of 14 made him believe he could earn money doing something he loved.

His father's ranch, The Diamond Horseshoe, gave him the exposure to horses and the working cowboy, which became natural subjects. This led to many portrait commissions.

As the years passed and Ken's family grew, he continued to focus on his drawings of these great subjects. In 1977 his work became widely recognized in a series of prints titled "The Men of the West."

Over the years, Ken's drawings and paintings have been in top cowboy art shows and auctions, including the C. M. Russell show in Montana, The Ellensburg Show in Washington and the Western Art Roundup in Nevada.

Because Ken's grandfather was full blooded Choctaw and an artist himself working in wood producing carvings and furniture, Ken always felt a strong connection and pride in the American Indian.

In 1984 a collector of Indian artifacts asked him to do a series of drawings and paintings showing life on the Navajo Reservation. This commission produced a wealth of subject matter for years to come. His work soon included Indians he met from many tribes.

Since moving back to California three years ago, Ken has done a number of local landscapes and bridges.

These include landscapes around the Butte Meadows and Paradise areas and bridges, including the Honey Run Bridge, the Oregon City Bridge and the footbridge at the Oroville Fore Bay.

Oct. 14, 2016 to mid-January, 2017; ♦♦♦ Art by Daphyne Altman

Self-taught
Self-motivated
Unfettered
Unstructured

Unafraid to try
Whatever is colorful

Whatever brings joy
I never forget
That too much
Is not enough.

I have not had formal art training in painting or drawing. I consider myself a self-taught, naive, decorative artist—starting as a child old enough to hold a crayon.

A great love of crafts has let me indulge my long life in pursuing many of them. My main passions are creating and color, but somehow I never get far from painting and drawing.

When creating, you are lifting your spirits, which I am sure helps healing. In my case, at age 52, I had a radical mastectomy, and at age 62 I had a mastectomy. I am now age 93 and have done lots of creating. 

I want to thank the Enloe Cancer Center for giving me the opportunity to display some of my endeavors.

Previous works on display

July 18 to Oct 14, 2016 ♦♦♦ Poetry & Art by Patricia Wellingham-Jones, Joan Goodreau, Caroline Burkett, Barbara Luzzadder, and Reta Rickmers

Poetry and Art, natural companions. For everyone, the cancer experience brings unique emotional terrain, and expressing feelings through words or images can become a path to healing. When shared, the effects multiply, to embrace you, the viewer, as well. 

In the long history of one art form responding to another, here are examples of the visual artist inspired by the poem, the writer spurred to words by a painting, or the happy instance of one existing work perfectly illustrating the other. Ekphrastic art, such interplay of forms, can be found in galleries and classrooms and, yes, in medical centers.

To see the poems and artwork together, visit the Healing Art Gallery at Enloe Regional Cancer Center.

Photograph, from left: Barbara Luzzadder, Patricia Wellingham-Jones, Reta Rickmers and Joan Goodreau (not pictured: Caroline Burkett)

Artists

Caroline Burkett writes, “I’ve been out of the art studio for a long time. So it was a pleasure to say ‘yes’ when Joan Goodreau asked me to do a photograph for her collection of poems ‘Open In The Back.’ Joan is a survivor of cancer and little did I realize I would be following in her footsteps three years later. I’ve always enjoyed Joan’s poetry for her humor in facing life’s challenges. She is a courageous woman, mother and friend.”

Caroline graduated with an MFA from Mills College, Oakland, Calif., and a BA from California State University at Hayward, developed the Ceramic Sculptural Program for adult persons with disabilities at Creative Growth Art Center, Oakland, Calif., taught ceramics and sculpture at Chico Art Center, Butte College, Richmond Art Center, Creative Growth Art Center and Studio One Oakland, and has exhibited artwork throughout the United States, Denmark and France as well as locally at the Chico Art Center and Butte College. Her latest interests are combining photography and graphics to tell pictorial stories of Butte Creek Canyon’s wildlife and ecosystem.

 

Barbara Luzzadder is a photographic artist, influenced by her background in the traditional arts. "Capturing and composing the subject's uniqueness through the camera lens is only part of it. Finding the story and giving it a new dimension is the goal." She has exhibited and won numerous awards for her photographic art. Also a poet, combining her images with the written word has been her specialty as a guest speaker/exhibitor.

A former educator, Barbara holds a BA in Business, Multiple Subject Teaching Credential, School Library/ Medial Specialist Credential and MA in education. Her Master's Thesis, "Motivating Children to Read and Write Poetry Through a Visual Experience," includes research on children's poetry, for which she wrote a series of children's poems and illustrated them with her photography.

A breast cancer survivor, Reta Rickmers is also an artist when she has time. "Art is about processing my life. I deal with memories, childhood, hardships, and hope. My art helped me immensely during the cancer healing process."

Rickmers works mainly in acrylics, collage, and block prints. She finds that art relaxes her and revitalizes her at the same time. For 26 years she has taught high school art at Pleasant Valley High School in Chico. She loves working with teenagers and helping them learn artistic ways to express themselves. She is the current recipient of the National Art Educators Pacific Region Secondary Art Teacher of the Year.

Poets

A Pushcart Prize nominee, Joan Goodreau has published numerous articles, stories and poetry in journals and anthologies in North America. Her recent books are "Strangers Together: How My Son's Autism Changed My Life" and "Another Secret Shared," which included poems about her cancer treatment. Her short play about cancer, Eviction, has been produced at Chico's Blue Room Theatre and the Enloe Regional Cancer Center. 

Patricia Wellingham-Jones is a widely published retired RN, former psychology researcher and writer/publisher. A cancer survivor, she has a special interest in healing writing, with poems recently in "The Widow’s Handbook" (Kent State University Press), and led the Enloe Regional Cancer Center's Telling Our Stories expressive writing group for years. Chapbooks include Don’t Turn Away: poems about breast cancer, End-Cycle: poems about caregiving, Apple Blossoms at Eye Level, Voices on the Land and Hormone Stew.

April 15 to July 15, 2016 ♦♦♦ Works by Susan Caron Proctor

Artist Statement: My name is Susan Caron Proctor and I majored in art at Marymount College in Southern California. In 1981 I received a Graphic Art Certificate from UC Davis. Over the years I have worked and exhibited in watercolors, acrylics and pen and ink. For the last 20 years I have centered on scratchboard.

Scratchboard is a piece of masonite covered with a clay substance. I apply paint on the surface. After the paint is dry, I incise the colors with a knife to create lines or larger negative spaces. Using this method, hidden figures can be drawn while still maintaining the original painting.

My Father was an artist, so due to this exposure I started to draw at a very young age. The feelings of happiness, humor or worry that I experienced growing up soon began to be expressed through my art. I refer to this place where I hold my feelings as my “Secret Garden.”

The longer you look at my paintings the more you are drawn in and images begin to emerge in unsuspecting places. These hidden images are expressions of my feelings during my creative process. And the Art of Healing begins. Cancer touches us all, whether it is your brother, lifelong friend or even oneself. You may find yourself as a caretaker or a friend that lifts the spirit. We are all involved.  Sometimes through the Art of Healing we can find our Secret Garden and our spirit will be lifted.

Jan 14, 2016 through April 13, 2016 ♦♦♦ Works by Tom Kocotis 

Artist Statement: My art career has evolved since I graduated with a B.A. and M.A. in the Art Department at California University San Jose.

My desire from the beginning was to control watercolor, oil and pastel mediums with precision. The professors at SJSU provided me with a wealth of knowledge in controlling these traditional mediums. Their philosophy and techniques were a great influence on my artistic interpretations for the last 40 years. My artwork has been displayed throughout the Bay Area and Northern California, San Francisco, Saratoga, Napa, Yountville, Chico and Orland.

During my retirement I was diagnosed with lymphoma. That created a mental set back while I was under treatment. I patiently waited the treatment out and returned to my painting schedule. So far so good. My family relocated to Chico in 2000 from the Bay Area. I find the landscape in Northern California to be romantic and ideal for my artistic interest particularly the buildings, barns, trees, water, people, large fields, stones, lakes and rivers. I feel the viewer can access personal pleasure when viewing my work as everything is representational and in some way connected to one‘s day to day surroundings.

Thank You for a Successful Celebration of Healing Arts

The foyer was standing room only on Thursday, Jan. 14 as Barbara Aguilera and John Los performed “Eviction,” a 10-minute play written by Joan Goodreau, local author and cancer survivor, after her successful diagnosis and treatment.

A moving poetry reading by Patricia Wellingham-Jones and rousing musical interludes by the band “Untethered” rounded out the performance. Many thanks to our volunteer Healing Art Committee, the featured artists and toall who contributed to the success of the Celebration of Healing Arts at Enloe Regional Cancer Center.  

 

Oct. 14, 2015 through Jan. 13, 2016 ♦♦♦ Kiln-Formed Functional Art Glass by Dia Kimm

Dia Kimm’s current collection of fused glass plates and serving trays are influenced by the lovely and timeless appeal of a traditional silk kimono. The Kimono Collection accentuates line, texture and balance – function with a dramatic flair that entertains the eye while presenting ones favorite food. Dia Kimm is a native Californian.

 

Artist Statement: Before I went back to college in my 60s, I designed leather garments in the early '70s to 1999 along with my husband of 45 years. I stepped away from my sweet life with Walter to be with my brother during his final battle with cancer. I went back to college in my 60s. I was diagnosed with cancer; surgery then chemo then recovery and survival.

I returned to school, was hired by Butte College Child Development Center as a Master teacher and retired 2 years ago. Walt and I have lived in Hawaii, Central America, and Europe; we have travelled overland through the Middle East to India taking eight months. Our many adventures include Southeast Asia and Indonesia. Today I care for my 89 years healthy Mother. I love creating functional pieces of Art Glass. There are limitless possibilities that glow and shine and make me smile. I love seeing the effect glass has on others.

 For inquiries about the work, contact Dia at (530) 877-2708, or waltanddia@netzero.net.

Previous works on display in 2015

Artwork by Barbara Anne Ramsey

Barbara Anne Ramsey is an artist that lives the life she creates in her art. Born in Susanville, California, she spent her formative years growing up in the ranching country of Northern California in the small town of Adin. Her family moved to Paradise during her early teen-age years where the rest of her family has resided since 1932. She has work published in the Best of Colored Pencil 2 (1993). 

Her most recent awards are 2007 Heritage Roundup Award at the Annual Western Art Roundup in Winnemucca, Nevada; 2013 second place in painting at the Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale; 2013 first place in colored pencil at the Draft Horse Classic Art Show Grass Valley, CA. She has spent the last 35 years as a professional artist, participating in many juried shows and winning several awards.  She has much of her artwork in private as well as corporate collections with several limited prints. She has taken workshops with wildlife artist Greg Beecham, Chad Poppleton and Julie Chapman. For inquiries, contact Barbara at 530-872-2953 or at www.barbaraanneramsey.com

Artist Statement: My love of nature and the western way of life will keep me drawing and painting as long as I can. I felt this show was a good way to honor my mother who passed away 4 years ago from ovarian cancer, and my daughter who was just diagnosed with stage one breast cancer. My Mom was so proud of my art and had several art works that I did for her even though she could never understand my love of animals.  When she was sick, doing a little art each day helped me deal with the stress and get through the tough times of caring for her. Happy Trails…

The Three Bays" (Colored pencil)

Watercolors by Candy Matthews

Artist Statement: When I was asked to show my work for the Enloe Cancer Center, I felt incredibly honored and then thought about what I would paint. After tossing about many different ideas, I decided to paint “Life.”

Paintings that represent life and growth and the beauty in the world around us. And in my mind, flowers, birds, and fruits all exemplify life in the most perfect way. Birds sing with joyous voices, and flowers and fruits thrill us with their incredible colors and shapes and tastes. Perhaps my paintings will bring happiness to those who need joy. These paintings honor my mother and then the many other people who I have lost from cancer. What a special opportunity.

“Finch on Peony” (Watercolor)

The work on display was: “White Camellia,” “Meyer Lemons,” “Clay Bottle with Dogwood Blossoms,” “Magnolia Pod,”and “Onions From My Garden.” For more about Candy Matthews and her work, visit candymatthewsart.com.

 

Ceramic Wall Hangings by Tedo Best

Artist Statement: Tedo Best grew up in Illinois and attended Northwestern University and the Chicago Art Institute. She works primarily in clay, and her pieces have been shown in Mendocino, San Francisco, San Jose, Chico, and Reno, Nevada. Tedo was treated for breast cancer in 2000, and is happy to be a survivor. She greatly enjoys clay and its many possibilities. Among the wall hangings on display at the cancer center was this piece, entitled "Roots."

 

 

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    Drs. Voelker and Lobosky honored with 2014 Physician Legacy Award

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    Drs. Voelker and Lobosky honored with 2014 Physician Legacy Award

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    Drs. Voelker and Lobosky honored with 2014 Physician Legacy Award

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